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Devil's Gullet and Lake Mackenzie

After a long steep drive up gravel roads, after turning off well before Lake Rowallan, about 21klm from Mole Creek. The road climbs and winds from the start until you reach the top of the plateau, and you arrive at the roadside lookout, which is more just a space to park, before taking the 10 minute walk through alpine shrubs with a little elevation but easy walk, with well maintained paths. One moment you're walking amongst the alpine shrubs, the next, you're at the lookout perched on the of a cliff, with the Gullet's valley literally under your feet. After you've spent some time taking in the beauty, and getting blown back from the edge of the Gullet, and given favourable weather condition, then Lake Mackenzie is another few kilometres up the road, and is mainly a flat drive.Lake Mackenzie which is 1120 metres above sea level, is a low dam across a shallow valley, that can be a tranquil spot. Fishing, boating and swimming are allowed, with restrictionsClick here to view our Gallery of Devil's Gullet and Lake Mackenzie.

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Vale of Belvoir

Category: Look BackVale of Belvoir
Located 15km North North West of Cradle Mountain, the Vale of Belvoir is a large open limestone valley, about 10km long and 2km wide, with a large grassy area, and flanked by ancient rainforest's and eucalyptus forests.The Vale of Belvoir is an important botanical, geological and historical site, with majestic, and welcoming ambience which is very surreal.The Vale was given it's name in 1827 by Joseph Fossey, after the valley in Leicestershire in England. Cattle was grazed in the area from the 1850's, originally by the Field family, then by George Moon, then by the William's family from Narrawa, near Wilmot. George Williams also ran a dairy herd, and operated a cheese factory. The discarded whey was popular with the local thylacines and tiger snakes.The Charleston family from Wilmot took over grazing from the Williams during the 1960's, with the annual cattle drives from Wilmot and back were part of the families memorable events. They later sold their Vale property to the Tasmanian Land Conservancy in 2008, while continuing the right to graze during summer periods.With a sub-alpine character the Vale lies at an altitude of about 800m. The Vale is underlain by Ordovician limestone which has been dated to be about 450 millions years old, and represents the only sub-alpine limestone valley in the state.As with other limestone valleys, numerous sink holes and caves appear across the Vale, and re typically 10-20m across, with grassy and muddy walls, and floors where the soil has collapsed over time into the cave beneath. Many of these have wombat burrows on their sides, showing very large populations, and other marsupials in the area.The Vale has unusual bi-directional drainage of the valley, which may be a result of the basalt flow. At the North end is Lake Lea, which flows Northwards via the Lea River into the Iris-Wilmot system and out into Bass Strait. The Southern flowing Vale River drains the rest of the Valley, out into the Pieman River on the West Coast.For more information about the Vale of Belvoir visit Tasmanian Land Conservancy website.Click here to view our gallery of the Vale of Belvoir.

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